The Importance of GA Auto Insurance

Have you ever been in an auto accident? These days, there are very few people who have not. Whether it be a fender bender or a full on accident, wrecks do happen on a regular basis. If you do not have GA auto insurance, then you need to understand the importance of having a policy. In fact, having the right coverage is more important than you may have realized. Here is what you need to know about just how important auto insurance in GA is.

 

It is the law. Some people do not realize this, but it is against the law to have a vehicle and not have at least minimal coverage on the vehicle. According to Georgia law, you must have at least liability insurance. This means that your insurance will be able to pay if you were to injure someone else or damage their vehicle. If you get stopped by the police and you do not have insurance, then you could at the very least get a ticket.

 

It is for protection of you. If you are in an auto accident that is your fault or if it is someone else’s fault and they do not have coverage, then you could have a big problem if you do not have your own GA auto insurance. With the right policy, you will be able to have your vehicle repaired or replaced and your medical bills will be covered should you become injured. If you do not have auto insurance, then you could face thousands or even tens of thousands of dollars in expense that will have to come from your pocket.

 

With this information, you can definitely understand the importance of GA auto insurance. Make sure you have policy coverage or you could be breaking the law and taking a very big risk with your vehicle and yourself.

Please choose from one of the following links for the type of insurance you need:

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Have you ever been in an auto accident? These days, there are very few people who have not. Whether it be a fender bender or a full on accident, wrecks do happen on a regular basis. If you do not have GA auto insurance, then you need to understand the importance of having a policy.

December 13, 2012